A composite of many actual steamboats that plied America’s rivers in the 19th century, the 100-foot-long William D. Evans was launched in 1986 as a loving tribute to that era’s most elegant mode of transportation. From the three hand-crafted wooden masts at her bow, to the twelve ton paddlewheel at her stern, she recalls in smallest detail a colorful period of American history typified by graceful living. Skimming the blue-green waters of Mission Bay, the William D. Evans presents a magical setting in which to stage a truly memorable event. Equipped to handle 600 guests, she provides all the modern amenities while still maintaining an air of 19th century elegance. Everywhere are signs of countless hours patiently spent attending to the smallest details. Asian ironwood parquet floors, custom-woven wool carpets, hand-carved mahogany doors, and delicately etched glass.
Everything about her takes you back to a time of elegant ladies, maverick card players and rip-roaring entertainment. Stroll the gently curved decks of teak. Run your hands over the smooth varnished rails. Ceilings of ornamental-pressed tin glint with highlights from shimmering hand-crafted lamps. At every-glance, polished brass gleams a golden glow. An exquisite masterpiece of stained glass artistry arcs above your head as 50,000 pieces of European stained glass form a vaulted skylight 42 feet long and 18 feet wide. Portraying life when the paddle-boat dominated the waterways, this incredible achievement is stunning both day and night. By night the William D. Evans becomes the gem of the bay with total illumination from stem to stern. Interior lighting makes her glass glow, while orange-colored “fire” within the smoke stacks flickers in the night sky.